Nursing

Nurse reported quality of care: A measure of hospital quality

As the primary providers of round-the-clock bedside care, nurses are well positioned to report on hospital quality of care. Researchers have not examined how nurses’ reports of quality correspond with standard process or outcomes measures of quality. We assess the validity of evaluating hospital quality by aggregating hospital nurses’ responses to a single item that asks them to report on quality of care.

Organization of hospital nursing and 30-day readmissions in Medicare patients undergoing surgery

Background: Growing scrutiny of readmissions has placed hospitals at the center of readmission prevention. Little is known, however, about hospital nursing - a critical organizational component of hospital service system - in relation to readmissions.

Objectives: To determine the relationships between hospital nursing factors - nurse work environment, nurse staffing, and nurse education - and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients undergoing general, orthopedic, and vascular surgery.

Better nurse staffing and nurse work environments associated with increased survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest patients

BACKGROUND: Although nurses are the most likely first responders to witness an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and provide treatment, little research has been undertaken to determine what features of nursing are related to cardiac arrest outcomes.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and IHCA survival.

Factors associated with eating performance for long-term care residents with moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment

AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the association of specific personal and environmental factors with eating performance among long-term care residents with moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment.

BACKGROUND: Eating is the one of the most basic and easiest activities of daily living to perform. While multilevel factors can be associated with eating performance, the evidence among those with dementia was insufficient.

Racial and Ethnic Minority Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in the U.S.

BACKGROUND: Understanding minority nurses' job satisfaction is a critical first step to inform strategies designed to retain minority nurses and improve institutional climate to ensure sustained diversity. Yet, empirical evidence is limited in this regard, especially comparisons across racial and ethnic groups in a national sample in the U.S.

OBJECTIVES: To determine minority nurses' job satisfaction across racial and ethnic groups relative to White nurses using a national representative sample.

Training of Community Health Workers to Deliver Cancer Patient Navigation to Rural African American Seniors

Background: Rural African American (AA) seniors may experience significant challenges during cancer treatment. Previous research suggests community health workers (CHWs) can provide effective cancer patient navigation (CPN) support.

Objectives: To develop a Train the Trainers (TTT) program for CHWs in rural Central Virginia who would navigate local AA seniors with cancer and train their support persons to provide similar types of assistance.

AORN and University of Michigan School of Nursing Research Alliance

Research related to perioperative care requires advanced training and is well suited to take place at a research-intensive university. A recent research alliance established between AORN and the University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, uses the strengths of both a robust perioperative professional organization and a research-intensive university to make progress toward improving patient safety and transforming the perioperative work environment.

Elaboration of Leadership and Culture in High-Performing Nursing Units of Hospitals as Perceived by Staff Nurses

This study was developed to further elaborate the phenomena of the relationship between leadership, culture, and performance at the grassroots level - a patient care/nursing unit - of a healthcare organization.

Nurse Reported Quality of Care: A Measure of Hospital Quality

As the primary providers of round-the-clock bedside care, nurses are well positioned to report on hospital quality of care. Researchers have not examined how nurses' reports of quality correspond with standard process or outcomes measures of quality.

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