News

  • Press Releases  |  Aug 1, 2008

    Kynna Wright-Volel, of the University of California, Los Angeles, is using her Nurse Faculty Scholar grant to conduct research on childhood obesity among Latino children. Through a nutrition and physical education program at local elementary schools, Wright-Volel aims to improve health outcomes and eliminate health disparities for children from underserved communities, where the obesity epidemic often hits hardest.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 31, 2008

    Jennifer Wenzel is a Nurse Faculty Scholar from the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Her research addresses health disparities affecting rural African American seniors who have been diagnosed and treated for cancer. Wenzel assists patients and families through cancer diagnosis and treatment, and helps them navigate the health care system.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 30, 2008

    Jennifer Runquist is focusing her Nurse Faculty Scholar research on how sleep deprivation affects depression in women after childbirth. Depression often goes undiagnosed or untreated, and it can have serious effects on infants and affect them as they grow into adulthood. Runquist is an assistant professor at the College of Nursing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 30, 2008

    Nancy Hanrahan is using her three-year Nurse Faculty Scholars grant to examine outcomes from patients admitted to hospitals for psychiatric services. Hanrahan, of the University of Pennsylvania, hopes that understanding organizational performance, quality of services provided, and outcomes for patients and staff will assure optimal management of inpatient psychiatric services and effective patient care.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 28, 2008

    Conducting a first of its kind clinical trial, the University of Virginia’s Kathryn Laughon is using her Nurse Faculty Scholar grant to test a computerized program that creates a personalized safety plan for battered women. Intimate partner violence is a significant public health burden for society, and although safety planning is critical to domestic violence intervention, its effectiveness has not previously been analyzed.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 28, 2008

    Nurse Faculty Scholar Joachim Voss is studying methods to better manage fatigue in HIV patients. Voss is using his Nurse Faculty Scholar grant to develop a diagnostic test for detecting protein changes in energy production of these patients, to improve their diagnosis and contribute to more effective treatment strategies. Voss is an assistant professor at the School of Nursing at the University of Washington.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 25, 2008

    Continuing her long-term interest in assisting those with chronic conditions, Teresa Sakraida of the University of Colorado Denver is using her Nurse Faculty Scholar grant to research self-management of type 2 diabetes and stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Sakraida will test a tailored behavioral education and counseling intervention to improve health outcomes, quality of life, and glycemic control.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 25, 2008

    Nurse Faculty Scholar Robert Atkins is exploring how adolescents in high-poverty, urban neighborhoods promote, maintain and restore their health. He hopes to use the knowledge he gains to identify ways to reduce health disparities and unequal access to health care in vulnerable adolescent populations. Atkins is an assistant professor at the College of Nursing at Rutgers.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 25, 2008

    As one of 15 inaugural Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Faculty Scholars, Angela Amar of Boston College is studying the factors that encourage college women to report experiences of interpersonal violence. The findings will be used to develop campus and national policies, as well as campus programming to encourage women to report these episodes.

  • Press Releases  |  Jul 22, 2008

    Nurse Faculty Scholar Jacquelyn Taylor of Yale University is examining the interaction between genetic and social factors related to high blood pressure to understand control and prevention of hypertension in African American children. “Nursing interventions that focus on gene-environment aspects of chronic disease could decrease the prevalence and improve qualify of life among patients at risk for high blood pressure,” Taylor says.

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